Get Ready for Research Computing Spring Bootcamp!

Research Computing Spring Bootcamp is April 29 to May 3
April 9, 2019

Join IST and the Libraries from April 29 to May 3 for Research Computing Spring Bootcamp! 

Does your research rely on computing, or are you curious about research data management and other library-assisted research topics? Then join IST and the Libraries from April 29 to May 3 for their Research Computing Spring Bootcamp! 

This week-long event is designed for faculty members, students, postdoctoral fellows, and other researchers across campus. Registrants can partake in workshops on a variety of research computing topics, such as Python, HPC clusters, data management planning, and more!

Registration is free and open to all. Anyone who wishes to learn more about research computing is welcome to attend. 

Browse workshops below: 

Introduction to Python, Pandas, and Plotting
Date: Monday, April 29
Time: 9am - 4pm
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitators: Chris Want & John Simpson
AT CAPACITY - Join the waitlist!

This is a full-day introductory session on using the Python programming language, with a particular focus on data analysis using the Pandas library and plotting. No previous programming experience assumed. Bring your own laptop with Python 3 installed. If you do not have a version of Python and are not sure where to start, then consider following the instructions for you operating system that are found at https://swcarpentry.github.io/python-novice-gapminder/setup/
 
Research Solutions Centre
Date:
Tuesday, April 30
Time: 10:30am - 12pm
Location: GSB 2-10 (green space on second floor of IST)
Facilitator: John Simpson
Register now!

Research computing on campus is supported by a number of different people and organizations making it the case that deploying new or suitably complicated projects can be difficult to coordinate. This session uses a drop-in “speed networking” format designed to facilitate several quick conversations to discover common challenges and share the things that can help you get your research done. You’ll also meet library staff involved in supporting research data management and learn about what they offer and be able to quickly scaffold together a plan for deploying your research.
 
HPC: Shell
Date:
Tuesday, April 30
Time: 1-4pm
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitator: John Simpson
AT CAPACITY - Join the waitlist!

This is the first workshop in a three-part series designed to move researchers from no previous experience using high performance computing (HPC) clusters towards a position of confident and competence. The HPC clusters available for research use to U of A researchers all use various flavours of Linux and so some experience in a command line environment is needed to begin to use them. This workshop provides that background in a friendly, jargon-minimized, hands-on environment.

HPC: Essentials
Date:
Wednesday, May 1
Time: 9am - 12pm
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitator: Kamil Marcinkowski
AT CAPACITY - Join the waitlist!

This is the second workshop in a three-part series designed to move researchers from no previous experience using high performance computing (HPC) clusters towards a position of confident and competence. This workshop focuses on the mechanics of submitting programs (aka “jobs”) to the clusters so that they can be scheduled and run. Led by Kamil Marcinkowski, scheduling team lead for Compute Canada, this workshop will contain extra emphasis on interacting with the scheduler to ensure that your work is getting done rather than sitting in the queue. This workshop provides that background in a friendly, jargon-minimized, hands-on environment.
 
HPC: Beyond
Date:
Wednesday, May 1
Time: 1-4pm
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitator: Chris Want
AT CAPACITY - Join the waitlist!

This is the third workshop in a three-part series designed to move researchers from no previous experience using high performance computing (HPC) clusters towards a position of confident and competence. This final workshop builds on the previous two by covering content that will influence how programs are written and compiled in the first place to make sure that you are getting the most work done for the time you have on the system. This workshop provides that background in a friendly, jargon-minimized, hands-on environment.
 
Intermediate Python: Parallelism
Date:
Thursday, May 2
Time: 9am - 12pm
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitator: Chris Want
AT CAPACITY - Join the waitlist! 

This half-day session will focus on writing parallel programs with Python (via the DASK library). Students should know some Python (possibly through the Introduction to Python session held on Monday, April 30) and some command line/shell (possibly through the HPC:Shell session held on Tuesday, May 1). 

Bring your own laptop with Python 3 and a shell installed. If you do not have a version of Python and are not sure where to start, then consider following the instructions for you operating system that are found at https://swcarpentry.github.io/python-novice-gapminder/setup/  

If you are using Windows and do not already have a Shell installed (Linux and MacOS come with them built in) the option we recommend is to install the Git Shell from https://git-scm.com/download/win but you are welcome to use any option that will give you the ability to open a secure shell (SSh) to a remote system.
 
Intermediate Python: Plotting
Date:
Thursday, May 2
Time: 1pm - 4pm
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitators: Chris Want & John Simpson
AT CAPACITY - Join the waitlist!

This half-day session will look at some additional plotting packages (Plotly and others) beyond the standard MatPlotLib. Students should know some Python (preferably through the earlier Python session held on Monday, April 30). 

Bring your own laptop with Python 3 installed.  If you do not have a version of Python and are not sure where to start, then consider following the instructions for you operating system that are found at https://swcarpentry.github.io/python-novice-gapminder/setup/
 
Introduction to OpenRefine
Date:
Friday, May 3
Time: 9-9:50am
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitators: Abigail Sparling & Amanda Nagyl
AT CAPACITY - Join the waitlist!

This session will introduce participants to OpenRefine, a powerful free and open source tool to work with large datasets. We will quickly work through how to use OpenRefine to effectively clean and format data and automatically track any changes. This session is suitable for beginners with no prior knowledge of OpenRefine.
 
Agent-Based Modelling Crash Course
Date:
Friday, May 3
Time: 10-10:50am
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitator: John Simpson
Register now!

Ever wondered what would happen if the world was just a little bit different? This fast introduction to agent-based modeling will introduce an offline tool (http://ccl.northwestern.edu/netlogo/) that can get you modeling complicated multi-agent environments quickly, allowing you to answer such wonderings. This is the first hour of a 3-hour workshop, and if there is enough interest, then the longer workshop will be offered in the future.  

Participants are encouraged to download and install NetLogo 6.0.4 in advance of the workshop in order to follow along with the shared examples from the included library of models. Note that NetLogo uses Java so the installation can take longer than expected. We will not be able to wait for installs to complete to start the workshop. Please reach out in advance if you have trouble. 
 
Data Management Plans & Using the Portage DMP Assistant
Date:
Friday, May 3
Time: 11-11:50am
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitator: James Doiron
Register now!

James Doiron, UofA Libraries Research Data Management Services Coordinator, will offer an applied session focused upon data management planning. Topics covered will include the importance and benefits of DMPs, how they can support your research, as well as an in-depth look at their content. Additionally, a hands-on demonstration of the freely available Portage Data Management Planning (DMP) Assistant platform will be offered. 

Participants are welcome to bring their own laptops should they wish to create a DMP Assistant account and learn to navigate and use this gold standard data management planning tool.
 
Fundamentals of Typography
Date:
Friday, May 3
Time: 12-12:30pm
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitator: Raheel Malkan
Register now!

Researchers are increasingly required to work with typography for their projects. This introductory session touches upon many effective practices when working with typefaces. At what point size is the type most legible in print? Which typefaces are most appropriate for the web? This session will guide participants through the fundamentals of typography to create work that is designed to be legible.
 
An Introduction to Dataverse: Supporting Research Data Deposit, Access, and Preservation
Date:
Friday, May 3
Time: 1-1:50pm
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitator: James Doiron
Register now!

James Doiron, the UofA Libraries Research Data Management Services Coordinator, will offer an applied session focused on Dataverse. Topics covered will include the importance and benefits of depositing your research data, impending related policies, as well as a hands-on demonstration of the UofA Libraries freely available Dataverse platform. Participants are welcome to bring their own laptops should they wish to create an account and learn to navigate and use Dataverse.
 
UALibraries' Data Collections and Subscriptions for the Researcher
Date:
Friday, May 3
Time: 2-2:50pm
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitator: Anna Bombak
Register now!

Learn how to use Library databases and subscriptions to locate and download statistics and quantitative public microdata from Statistics Canada, the ICPSR, Gallup Polls, UA Dataverse, and many other data collections and archives available to the University of Alberta researcher.
 
An Introduction to Command Line Basics: UNIX Shell
Date:
Friday, May 3
Time: 3-3:50pm
Location: CCIS L1 160
Facilitators: Danoosh Davoodi, Mariana P. Olea, John Huck
AT CAPACITY - Join the waitlist!

Command line interface (OS shell) and graphic user interface (GUI) are different ways of interacting with a computer’s operating system. The shell is a program that allows you to control your computer using commands entered with a keyboard instead of a visual interface/mouse/keyboard combination.

There are good reasons to learn command line basics. 1) When you need to repeat tasks tens to hundreds of times, knowing how to use the shell is great. Learning basic command line is useful to complete your work more efficiently and quickly. 2) For many research tools used for processing or visualizing data, there is no graphical interface and all operations are completed through the shell. 3) To use remote computers or cloud computing, you need to know command line basics.

This lesson guides you through the basics of file systems and the shell. If you have stored files on a computer at all and recognize the word “file” and either “directory” or “folder” (two common words for the same thing), you’re ready for this lesson. Instructors will aim to create a comfortable environment for total beginners while adapting content to match attendee's different experience levels. Please bring your own laptop.

 
Research Computing Spring Bootcamp is held in collaboration with University of Alberta Libraries and Information Services & Technology (IST).